MOUNT KILIMANJARO

MOUNT KILIMANJARO

Kilimanjaro is the world’s highest free standing, snow-covered equatorial mountain. Now charted and climbed; stories of her resident man-eating spirits are relegated to the realms of folklore.

But Mount Kilimanjaro continues to preserve a mysticism that defies all recent knowledge of her slopes. Images of the towering snow-covered cone rising majestically from fertile green foothills have become a powerful motif of Tanzania’s extraordinary extremes. Few could deny a very distinct sense of awe when the cloud clears to reveal a glimpse of the towering peaks, shining bright in the equatorial sun.

meru

MOUNT MERU TANZANIA

The dramatic crater of Mt. Meru is often neglected in favour of nearby to the east, but a visit to this spectacular mountain, located within Arusha National Park, is an unforgettable experience. It’s lower slopes are covered in dense highland forest, where colobus monkeys play and buffalo graze concealed beneath the thick foliage. The extinct volcano’s extensive base gives way to a perfectly formed crater, and another internal crater whose walls are sharp, sheer cliffs. An ash cone forms a subsidiary peak, and the Momela Lakes and Ngurdoto Crater are visible from Meru’s slopes.

usambara

USAMBARA MOUNTAINS

Usambara mountains are situated in the north-east of Tanzania. With their wide vistas, cool climate, winding paths and picturesque villages, the Usambara’s are one of Tanzanian’s highlights.

The Usambara’s are a part of the ancient Eastern Arc chain which mountains stretch in a broken crescent from the Taita hills in southern Kenya down to Morogoro and the southern highlands. They are estimated to be at least 100 million years old and the rocks forming them may be as much as 600 million years old. The mountains are home to an exceptional assortment of plants and animals and represent one of the highest degrees of biodiversity on the continent.